Plant Now, Reap Curb Appeal Next Spring!

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Now that spring is officially in swing, you can see how your home will appeal  to buyers next spring.

If you are thinking about selling but holding back, waiting for values to firm up, consider the delay a chance to fluff up your landscaping.

  • First,  walk your property.
  • Note now what  is in bloom now and what just bloomed so you can balance the yard with colors and flowers elsewhere.
  • Analyze what problems can be addressed with pruning;  what plants need to be replaced; and what sections of the yard need to be screened from view – trash cans, for example, or a dog run.

Next, draw up a plan.

  • Decide how to call attention to aspects of the yard that will appeal to buyers – a spacious patio, for example, or a grove of birch trees visible from the dining rom.
  • Concentrate on accenting these appealing areas with plants that will be in full bloom when you intend to put the house on the market.
  • Plan to draw attention to lovely aspects of the yard with spring blooming tulips and daffodils, and then, when those fade, geraniums in pots.
  • Conversely, screen awkward views, neighbors, trash cans, and utilitarian corners with trellises covered with plain green ivy or silverlace vines. Low-contrast colors will effectively hide the eyesores.
  • For the best chance that the plant will survive winter, get those intended to thrive in a slightly colder climate than yours.
  • Avoid fruit canes and vines, such as raspberry, grape and ornamental cherry.  They will look beautiful in bloom – for about a week. Then fallen fruit will stain sidewalks,  attract birds and raccoons, and sour the corners of your yard as it slowly rots.
  • Don’t plant too close to the foundation.  Shrubs will be hard to prune and too-close foliage can encourage mold and trap moisture.
  • If you have to fill in several spots, plan to have continual blooms. For example, plant daffodils by the front steps for mid-spring color and butterfly bushes  in the corner of the yard for early summer blooms.
    Inventory your array of pots and hanging baskets. Make a note to stalk bargains in September so you have a fresh selection of right-sized pots and baskets for strategically deploying annuals next spring.

Fastest Growing Shrubs

  • Butterfly bush – With its long spires of tiny flowers, butterfly bush is reminiscent of lilac, without the fragrance…or the woody habit.
  • Forsythia – Fountains of blooms in early spring yellow followed by narrow-leafed foliage, this is a classic eyecatcher.
  • Juniper- Choose “Skyrocket” for a fast green screen.
  • Red twig dogwood – Perfect for year-round drama, with bright red twigs dominating the fall and winter landscape.
  • Willow Hybrid – If you need a hedge by the end of the summer, this is the shrub for you.
  • Roses – go for hardy, low-care bush and climbing roses. Be sure to plant them well away from pathways…or under windows, where they can deter burglars.

Plant-and-forget Flowers

That last thing you will need next spring is more gardening chores.  Bulbs are inexpensive and reliable.  For midspring color, plant daffodil and tulip bulbs in early fall. For nonstop summer color, blend in daylily bulbs among the daffodils (the emerging daylilies will cover over the fading daffodil foliage, saving you a chore).